1. Daniele Tamagni and Araminta de Clermont at Michael Hoppen Contemporary
Above Vuyo, Khayelitsha by Araminta de Clermont.
Daniele Tamagni and Araminta de Clermont, explore two very distinct groups in their photography, which are united through a sense of fashion and style.
In Tamagni’s study of the Les Sapeurs, which won him an ICP Infinity Award earlier this year, we see the Italian photographer explore a Congolese subculture, noted for their highly tailored fashion called Le SAPE (Societe des Ambianceurs et des Personnes Elegantes), a style that has evolved from the British Dandy. And whilst fashion is of great importance to these ‘gentleman,’ who take great pride in their look and appearance, with their Dior, Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent suits, this is not merely a fashion movement — but a complete lifestyle — with a detailed code of honour, professional conduct and strict notions of morality.
Whilst British born de Clermont, who is based in South Africa, documents young girls dressed for their matriculation dance, which celebrates their graduation from school. With the portraits taken on the Cape Flats, a large expanse outside of Cape Town, that was once known as ‘apartheid’s dumping ground,’ the matriculation dance is of great significance, not only to the young women, but also to their families, many of whom will have saved for over a year to afford the beautiful gowns, which represent and appear to ‘speak volumes: about the hopes, dreams, aspirations and influences of young South Africans today.’
Daniele Tamagni and Araminta de Clermont, is at Michael Hoppen Contemporary, London until 6 June 2010. Daniele Tamagni’s Gentlemen of Bacongo is published by Trolley.

    Daniele Tamagni and Araminta de Clermont at Michael Hoppen Contemporary

    Above Vuyo, Khayelitsha by Araminta de Clermont.

    Daniele Tamagni and Araminta de Clermont, explore two very distinct groups in their photography, which are united through a sense of fashion and style.

    In Tamagni’s study of the Les Sapeurs, which won him an ICP Infinity Award earlier this year, we see the Italian photographer explore a Congolese subculture, noted for their highly tailored fashion called Le SAPE (Societe des Ambianceurs et des Personnes Elegantes), a style that has evolved from the British Dandy. And whilst fashion is of great importance to these ‘gentleman,’ who take great pride in their look and appearance, with their Dior, Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent suits, this is not merely a fashion movement — but a complete lifestyle — with a detailed code of honour, professional conduct and strict notions of morality.

    Whilst British born de Clermont, who is based in South Africa, documents young girls dressed for their matriculation dance, which celebrates their graduation from school. With the portraits taken on the Cape Flats, a large expanse outside of Cape Town, that was once known as ‘apartheid’s dumping ground,’ the matriculation dance is of great significance, not only to the young women, but also to their families, many of whom will have saved for over a year to afford the beautiful gowns, which represent and appear to ‘speak volumes: about the hopes, dreams, aspirations and influences of young South Africans today.’

    Daniele Tamagni and Araminta de Clermont, is at Michael Hoppen Contemporary, London until 6 June 2010. Daniele Tamagni’s Gentlemen of Bacongo is published by Trolley.

Notes

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